Safari vs Chrome – Who Will Be The Mobile Browser King in 5 Years

Despite Chrome’s strides to dethrone Safari and become the new king of the hill, Safari’s still the king. For now.

With the slew of fascinating functionalities that surpass user expectations and needs, the Safari mobile browser is rearing to rule the world of mobile browsers for years to come. This is not too surprising in light of its dominance as the browser of choice in many smartphones (namely iPhones). Still…don’t count Chrome out. They’ve been getting more converts every day.

Safari, King of the Hill

Safari Still Winning the Mobile Browser War
Safari Still Winning the Mobile Browser War

Safari has been fighting from their renowned research labs across the world (not to mention feedback of literally tens of millions of users).

Although Chrome is fighting tooth and nail to rule the mobile internet devices world (don’t forget the variety of third-party browsers like Mozilla, Opera, and even Dolphin), Safari is managing to put them in check with latest iOS version upgrades and facilities and an impressive 62% of mobile browser traffic.

The full-screen user interface of the Safari browser makes browsing on mobile smartphones and iPhones, iPad, and iPods a breeze. You can do away with all the distractions of your PC screen with the Safari browser, and its intuitiveness and response to zooming and window interface formatting options are simply amazing.

The features go on – you can tap the screen, pinch the screen, extend your fingers, scroll, and swipe between web pages to enjoy the best of the user interface application. Also, ever heard of Safari’s Reading List? This function allows you to save, read, and view. You can also use the iCloud technology to share it across your other iPad and iPod touch devices.

When you also consider the multi-touch functionality, the iCloud keychain, the unlimited tabs, parental controls, shared links and other favorites like photo and video online sharing, web audio functionality, and image rendering capabilities, Safari looks pretty darn impressive.

Bottom line? They’ve got user interface in the bag.

Chrome’s Fighting Chance


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But for many consumers, Chrome is much more likable and suitable to their mobile browsing needs. Many Apple products feature Chrome as the browser of choice.

There is no debating the fact that just about every Apple product with Wi-Fi runs Safari as the default, but Chrome has been making some major strides. Android users a have begun to take over Apple consumers, with many iPhones making the switch to Chrome.

Although you can easily download Chrome from Google Play, it comes as the default browser on most high-end android phones. The browser is non-intrusive with very minimal distractions, but it comes packed with super-awesome functionalities that are giving Safari the boot.

For instance, your Chrome browser comes with text scaling, unlimited tabs, Javascript compatibility, and accelerated browsing or loading speed. Did I mention complete Cloud capabilities? Also, their all-in-one Omnibar search tool? ‘Nuff said.


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Not only does Chrome has a lot of distinguishing features, it is also the best software that integrates the most fluidly with most other Google applications and offerings like Gmail, Google Drive, Google+, and all your Google docs. Google is even supposedly testing new touch features in Chrome and also speeding up its iOS data compression capabilities for better user experience. Like I said – major strides.

Here’s the big picture. Chrome and Safari are both killin’ it in the mobile browsing arena. The race is still too close to call, but in the next few years, Chrome or Safari are both candidates for a major breakaway to be the new (or returning) king of mobile browsing.

For now, grab some popcorn and enjoy the fight.

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About the Author

James Walker

James Walker

James is the Development Community Manager at Injekt, an open platform for third party app developers. An avid designer and coder since he was 12, James writes and curates topics on both basic web development and advanced languages with a particular focus on mobile. Connect with James on Twitter and Google+